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news on the bear area at 6:00. we'll see you then. lt by u.s. warplanes intensifies. a defiant gadhafi warns of a crusader war and vows to fight back. crusader war and vows to fight back. tonight, what is the endgame? captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening, everyone. the pentagon tonight says the allied assault on libya's military has inflicted heavy damage on moammar gadhafi's forces and grounded his combat planes. that assault, which we now know is being led by american warplanes, including long-range stealth bombers, has targeted both libya's air defenses and ground troops in an effort to halt gadhafi's attacks on anti-government rebels. but coalition officials insist gadhafi himself is not a target. tonight, as anti-aircraft fire lit up the skies over tripoli, libya's military command order claimed again it wasrding its units to observe is i cease-fire, a claim western forces are skeptical of. we begin tonight with jim miklaszewski. jim? >> reporter: lester, there's only been one full day of american and coalition air strikes against libya, but senior u.s. m
on the ground. we'll bring you more when we have it. >> kelly: all right. meantime the u.s. and its allies are moving in to try and end the violence against civilians in libya. president obama describing the effort today during his trip to brazil. >> and people of libya must be protected and in the absence of the immediate end to violence against civilians, our coalition is prepared to act and act with urgency. >> kelly: joining us now doug schoen, and gentlemen, thank you for joining us today. >> thank you. >> kelly: it's a fluid situation as you heard secretary of the state clinton talk about. the president, while he's talking about it still has not defined what the strategic objective in libya, other than he wants gaddafi to be held accountable and out. so is he making that case very clear? >> i don't think he is, kelly. i think it's a positive development that the president has said that we will support the coalition efforts and the french efforts to oust president gaddafi or colonel gaddafi. i think it's positive that he's enforcing the no-fly zone and reports the international effort
, who warned that u.s. military personnel and u.s. citizens in japan should actually go back to a radius of 80 kilometers around fukushima. japan has said 20 kilometers, so it seems that the u.s. has an assessment that is fairly serious. >> any idea if they are following the french lead, recommending that they leave japan altogether? >> we have not had any word on that from the united states government. i think that would be much further for the u.s. in the sense that the u.s. has so many people in the country, currently 50,000 u.s. troops currently in japan get there is concern. the u.s. government says it is monitoring -- currently in japan. there is concern. the u.s. government says it is monitoring the situation. there is no thought that anyone residing in the u.s. is at risk. >> but with 34 u.s. experts landing on wednesday, joining seven others, all with an american equipment, the u.s. is having to answer questions about whether it even trusts japan completely. >> a slight difference from what we are hearing out of japan and from the united states. i think it is worth pointing out
urgeent. u.s. and allied forces firing on libya igniting the biggest international military effort since the iraq war. this is a special edition of the fox report. new images showing u.s. navy ships firing missiles at qaddafi air defenses and teeping up with britain,itiny and canada all to support a rebel uprising in that country. it appears on the verge of defeat. secretary of state hillary clinton said left unchecked qaddafi will commit unspeakable atrocities . the first shots coming from french fighter jets. a plane shot down over the outskirts of benghazi bursting in flames . crashed and sending thick black smoke in the sky. rebels, cheering and celebrating as international forces move in tryying to protect them. so far 112 cruz missiles launched near tripoli. we have fox news team coverage on the ground . mike emanuel is traveling with the president in brazil and steve first in tripoli. steve, any reaction from qaddafi to the air trikes? >>reporter: john, what we heard from qaddafi in the past several days. one of defiance and he said he will retaliate against military or civilian t
. >> and ed henry is traveling with the u.s. president obama in south america. and in japan martin savidge is live in tokyo. >> retired general wesley clark and psychologist wendy walsh join us for analysis. >> i want to welcome our international viewers from around the world. i'm don lemon. >> and i'm jonathan mann from cnn international. let's get you caught up now on the latest news. >> we start in libya where the u.s. fired the first missiles inside libya just a short time ago. before that, french fighter jets made the first strike against moammar gadhafi's forces, destroying military vehicles. the international community is enforcing the u.n.'s no-fly zone over libya, pressuring gadhafi to stop killing his own people. we'll have a live report from tripoli in just a few minutes. >>> president obama, meantime, weighing in on the libya situation in brazil, the first day of his five-day trip. the president emphasized this is an international operation, the u.s. only playing its part along with a number of others. he also said the use of force was not the first choice but the international
. right now on "fox news sunday." missile strikes. the u.s. and britain fire more than 100 cruise missiles as coalition forces act to protect the libyan rebels from muammar qaddafi. we'll have an update on talk with the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen live on "fox news sunday." then two leading senators weigh in on the mix, lindsey graham and jack reed. japan works t work contain a nr disaster. we will get the latest from japan and talk with the secretary of energy steven chu. plus, we ask our sunday panel if the president is taking the lead on these issues or following. all right now on "fox news sunday." hello again from fox news in washington where we are tracking two major stories. we have a reporter in libya where the u.s. and its allies are using military force to protect the antiqaddafi rebels. and in japan, where officials are making progress toward bringing a nuclear plant under control. we'll have more on that later and talk with the secretary of energy. first, libya, u.s. stealth bombers struck a major libyan airfield. and qaddafi called the raids terr
. >> reporter: by this morning, the u.s.s. reagan and its support ships and other u.s. military personnel had already begun 20 missions. the aircraft have been conducting missions on the lookout for things like this, a man found 10 miles out to sea, clinging to his roof. he had apparently run back to his house to retriever things when the tsunami hit. he broke down and cried. his wife remains missing. in addition to military help, the u.s. is providing lots of civilian humanitarian add. two rescue teams, one from fairfax, virginia, the other from los angeles have arrived in japan. they are among teams sent from 10 different countries. the american red cross also helping out in an assistance capacity for the japanese red cross. >> there are also pockets of communities where no one has been able to get to yet, because they've been cut off by roads that have been destroyed or even by the tsunami waters that haven't receded. those are the people we're really worried about. >> reporter: the good news about this disaster with so many assets already in place in japan at the naval base, the naval sta
in washington president obama is facing lots of criticism for the u.s. mission in libya. two and a half hours from now he'll try to ease concerns about the operation's goals, its costs and the end game. his remarks coming a little over a week from the first coalition air strikes and critical time for opposition fighters on the ground. gadhafi's troops wiped out some of the gains but in recent days coalition air strikes have helped rebels seize some of the northern stays. now to reza sayah with more on benghazi. what's the latest information, ressa, that you are getting. >> reporter: these forces had an impressive three days capturing five towns from the gadhafi forces. today they finally met some resistance, the first in about 72 hours. that resistance coming in the city of sirte, gadhafi's birthplace, his hometown. when you talk to opposition officials here they anticipated a fights there and they got t.rebel figorces pushing back a one rebel fighter telling cnn that he and a group of other fighters cornelio sommaruga gadhafi soldiers waving a right flag, that, of course, the universal signa
't use violence against his people. does it show how little leverage the u.s. has in yemen now? >> reporter: we are seeing more and more the past few weeks, it looks as though the u.s. has more leverage. we saw a comment from the president in the last few weeks saying the u.s. shouldn't meddle. foreigners shouldn't intervene in the affairs there. there was a call between john brennan, the assistant to the president for homeland security. he was there telling yemen president they were praising him for his initiative and make sure they protect the protesters there. they agreed to that. today, you are seeing a crackdown, again. this is worrying to the u.s. there should be dialogue in yemen. the president is saying there should be. but we are seeing more and more violence in the streets. >> joining us live from abu dabi. that you know for that. >>> a critical and dangerous situation is going on right now with two nuclear plants damaged by the massive quake in japan. to make a bad situation worse, an explosion at one of them today. we have the latest coming up. [ male announcer ] 95
military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands of people could die. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolution will be enforce enforc
military targets overnight. a spokesman suggests u.s. combat operations may have peaked. the u.s. role is in the no-fly zone. it's moving from action to patrolling phase today. libyan handlers took journalists to see damage inside gadhafi's compound. that happened earlier today. a possible missile wrecked a four-story building. gadhafi was not the target. >>> defense secretary robert gates arrived in russia today as that country's prime minister turned up the heat. putin ripped the united states for what he called a steady trend of intervention abroad. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition and be a member of the coalition and have a military role in the coalition. >> arab league president is toning down his criticism of the coalition attacks. he met with u.n. secretary moon in cairo today saying he's committed to the u.n. resolution on libya. yesterday, he complained the campaign was too broad and civilians were killed. >>> libya freed four new york times journalists today. the four cro
. >> president obama works to ease fears at home saying the u.s. is not at risk from the radiation. >> susie: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the united states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska or u.s. territories in the pas civic. >> susie: besides japan'
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
employees. >>> breaking news overnight. u.s. and allied forces bomb libyan targets as "operation odyssey dawn" is under way. and moments ago, we got new word on the success of the campaign so far. >>> and new word from libya's leader this morning as well, as antiaircraft fire from gadhafi forces, they lit up the skies of tripoli throughout the night there. >>> the day's other big story, fallout from the japanese quake even a week after the tsunami. this new and frightening video is surfacing. the very latest from there in moments. good morning, everyone, i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc sunday." we begin with breaking news. >>> new word from the top u.s. military chief just moments ago. admiral mike mullen tells nbc news a no-fly zone is in effect in libya this morning after american and european forces rained down missiles on libya's defenses. the u.s. and britain unleashed 114 tomahawk cruise missiles targeting libyan surface-to-air sites as well as radar and communications centers. three american b-2 stealth bombers also dropped more than 40 bombs on libyan defenses. now, the goal of
. right now, on fox news sunday. ♪ missile strikes, the u.s. and britain fire more than 100 cruise missiles, as quo litigation forces act to protect the libyan rebels from muammar qaddafi. we'll have an update from libya, and, talk with a chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, live, only on fox news sunday. then, two leading senators weigh in on the mission, lindsey graham and jack reed. japan works to contain a nuclear disaster, what does the crisis there mean for energy policy at home? we'll talk with the secretary of internally, steven chu and we'll ask our sunday panel if the president is taking the lead on the tough issues or following. all, right now on fox news sunday. >> chris: we are trashing two major stories, we have a reporter in libya where the u.s. and allies are using military force, to protect the anti-qaddafi rebels. and, in japan, where officials are making progress for bringing a nuclear plant under control. we'll have more on that, later and talk with the secretary of energy, but, first, libya, allied officials say they hit more than 20 air
? >>> there is word that moammar gadhafi wants to trick journalists that innocent civilians have been killed. u.s. officials say that gadhafi was not the target of a missile. he wants bodies removed from morgues and put at the site of the bombing to make it look like innocent people were killed. military officials say they have made significant progress. they believe the attacks against his own people have all but stopped and air defense batteries have been destroyed. on air force one, secretary robert gates says the united states will not be leading the charge for long. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition. we will be a member of the coalition and have a military role in the coalition but not the preeminent role. >> jim is joining us live from tr tripoli. what are we hearing about these plans that moammar gadhafi -- what is happening with these bodies? >> reporter: right. the plan to move these bodies from morgue into bomb sites and then bring foreign journalists like us to report on that beefed
are found in tokyo's water supply, as the u.s. bans the import of some japanese foods. >> right there. right there! >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a monster of the deep. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. we will not surrender. those words, the defiant libyan leader moammar gadhafi, who made his first public appearance in a week. despite the allied-imposed no-fly zone, libyan troops continued their unrelenting attacks against rebel-held cities where conditions are described as desperate. the u.s. military says it is considering all options. explosions were heard in tripoli this morning. and susan mcginnis is in washington with more on this story. good morning, susan. >> hi, good morning, betty. the mission in libya is accomplishing its goal, including grounding gadhafi's air force. but as criticism of the operation grows, along with the cost, the u.s. is looking to hand off control. despite a fourth night of allied air strikes pounding libya, leader
to building more nuclear power plants in the u.s. that is up from last year. >>> and now, it is just about that time to head it to the man, the birthday man today, wolf blitzer in "the situation room." wolf, to you. >>> thanks very much, brooke. happening now, two u.s. air force crew members make it out of a fighter jet crash in libya alive. we are taking you to the crash site and telling you how libyan rebels help keep one of them safe. >>> also, president obama is facing growing anger for ordering air strikes in libya without the approval of congress. now, one fellow democrat, even talking about possible impeachment. >>> and new u.s. assessments of the radiation risks from japan's nuclear crisis and new progress inside the plant to shed light on the damage from the sudan. i'm wolf blitzer. you are in "the situation room." >>> some very anxious hours for the u.s. military after the crash of a fighter jet, giving way to relief now that the two crew members are safely out of libya. defense officials confirming that both the pilot and the weapons officer have been rescued. they say the f-15
>> tonight, battle for libya. u.s.-led attacks and enforcing a no-fly zone intensifies for a second day. but the pentagon says, muammar qaddafi is not a target. i'm russ mitchell. also tonight, on the ground, a defiant qaddafi shoots back bowing a long war as rebels take rounds in benghazi. >> anxiety rises in quake ravaged japan as food and water show signs of nuclear contamination. >>> and staying connected, technology provide's lifeline for students trying to find loved ones in japan's disaster zone. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> good evening. a second wave of u.s.-led air attacks against libya is under way tonight as b2 bombers from the first wave return to their base in missouri late tonight. on the ground, u.s. aircraft attack libyan forces south of benghazi for the first time while muammar qaddafi remained defiant, calling nations allied against him the party of satan and vowing to fight inch by inch for his country. we have correspondents on the ground in libya and in washington with the latest and we begin with national se
are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nuclear complex with so much problems in the past couple of days, today, another reactor facing the possibility of a meltdown. they say they are in control of the situation. but the evacuation from the region around the reactors continues and the possibility of poisoning from radioactivity also going forward. dozens are testing positive for that. now to the number. there is one official here, in one region who said yesterday that 10,000 people were missing. now he is saying he feels that 10,000 people are dead in his region alone. that may add to the figure. we traveled today and we notice shortages are a problem. of food, of fuel and power in this village, of everything people need to get by. that is why relief is rushing to this area. tod
u.s. destroyers in the mediterranean and three u.s. sub marines and one british sub marine. they were fired off of those at 2:00 p.m. eastern time. takes about an hour flying time for the tomahawks to strike their targets. there were about 20 targets evenly divided between the capital of tripoli as well as misred aed ta where we he do understand from reports on the ground that an air force academy was targeted there as well as the main air base that qadaffi has. also, two strikes against sert, the hometown of qadaffi but none against benghazi where the rebels are holed up. they wanted to avoid any casualties in benghazi. >> judge jeanine: that, of course, being the rebel stronghold. we are now six hours into the cruz missile attack. is it true that it will take in fact hours more for us to know the full extent of the cruz missile attacks? >> reporter: i think they are starting to get some reports. one u.s. defense official says that qadaffi's defense systems basically an sa 5 old soviet era defense system, ironically the same that was used by saddam hussein exactly 8 years
-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations full-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations of american citizens. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to install a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter planes will be brought in to help those wanting to leave the country. charlie d'agata is in yoshida, japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wonderi
have been discontinued. japanese officials said today they are asking the u.s. government for help. charlie d'agata is in niigata, japan, with more. good morning, charlie. >> reporter: good morning to you, betty. nobody is watching the events unfolding at the nuclear power plant more closely than the people here. many who were evacuated from the region around that plant and wonder if they'll ever be able to go home. fire trucks resumed blasting water onto japan's crippled nuclear power plant as crews raced to restore power to the facility. as early as today, they hope to feed electricity to at least two of the six overheated reactors, and get crucial water pumps working again. >> if the cooling systems in the reactors and fuel pumps are basically sound, and then the power comes on, then we might look at that moment as the beginning of the end of this crisis. >> reporter: but even if the power starts back up, it's not clear the water pumps will. they may have already suffered too much damage. there are also fears that getting power back online could spark another explosion. smoke bi
after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
. a major earthquake strikes japan... killing hundreds.. and triigering tsunami pacific and u-s. we have just learned that tsunami waves are hitting hawaii... being evacuated.some counties in washington state and oregon are also being evacuated. evacuated.here's a look at what started it all... the 8-point-9 magnitude qqake sent people fleeing into streets... and fell into waters unnerneaah.up to three-hundred bodies have been found in japan.. and hundreds of others areestill missing.the entire west coast of the u-s is under a tsunami warning. will they or won't they?that's the question when it comes to the looming n-f-l lockout.. after a week extension..the deadline is today.the n-f-l players union and team owners are at crossroads when it comes to money.if no progress is made, look for the owners to lock out the players. we are now just one day away from our be-more healthy expo. all day tomorrow ... you can come out to the convention center downtown to take a step towards a new more active lifes. lifestyle. candace dold is live in our studio with a preview. ad lib. 33 coming up..
. the u.s. fired more than 100 cruise missiles into libya today as french fighter jets targeted the that the postal -- khaddafi 's fighters from above. >> u.s. officials say this will not be a ground war. u.s. troops will not be on the ground in libya. so far, 110 vessels have been lost from the sea into libyan territory targeting communication sites, air defense sites, to make it safe enough for aircraft to find -- to flat over libya to enforce a no-fly zone. -- to fly over libya to enforce a no-fly zone. khaddafi officials are calling this a brutal assault. they are sticking by a cease- fire. on the ground today, there was no cease-fire. khaddafi pulse of course this but asked about the pulse el -- cannot pay -- >> president obama has promised u.s. ground forces will not enter libya. his decision has upset some lawmakers. obama said the u.s. and its allies had no toys but to act. brian moore has the story from washington. >> bomar gaddafi -- khaddafi defied orders. >> over 110 tomahawk cruise missiles fired from u.s. and british ships struck more than 20 integrated air defense
japan crews are trying to prevent a nuclear melt down. u.s. officials are trying to calm the nerves of americas who fear radiation can reach the west coast. >> we don't expect it to reach the west coast. >> we have the latest developments from the nuclear power plant, plus how one government age agency is beefing up radiation detection. >> crews are working around the clock at the fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. the crews are working to reconnect electricity to the cooling system to cool the rods. other crews are spraying and dumping water on the nuclear few. smoke can be seen from building number 2 right now. the cause is not known but a explosion hit the building on tuesday. it is possible the cooling chamber is damaged. low levels of radiation have been detected beyond tokyo, which is 140 miles south of the nuclear power plant. u.s. is warning americans to leave the country and the government is offering voluntary evacuations. today president obama spoke about the situation in japan. this is video of president obama visiting the japanese embassy. the president wrote a mes
. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americans from japan and u.s. officials reminded those staying behind to get out of that 50-mile danger zone around the fukushima dai-ichi plant. the reactors damaged by friday's earthquake and tsunami were bombarded today with water mr. from helicopters, police water cannons and fire trucks to try to cool them off and prevent a meltdown, but it's not at all clear if it's working. and in washington, the head of the nuclear regulatory commission said it could take weeks to get these reactors under control. bill whitaker in japan begins our coverage. >> reporter: this new video released today gives the clearest picture yet of the stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. >> what we're seeing is that the damage from the fires is very significant. >> reporter: today, japanese military helicopters with protective led-lined cockpits dumped water on reactor three, attempting to cool the nuclear fuel rods. but much of the water appeared to disperse in the wind. police and firefighters also brought in water cannons to douse the reactor but
>> couric: tonight, as allied forces pound targets in libya, the u.s. military insists qaddafi is not a target, but the commander in chief makes it clear... >> it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebels solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the opera
there is no sign dangerous radiation is coming here. >>> good evening. as we come on the air tonight, the u.s. navy is now racing to the rescue in japan. where there is word that electricity is about to return to the fukushima nuclear plant, and the u.s. is flying in five giant pumps from a navy base in nagasaki. they are pumps that can deliver enormous amounts of water, after we all watched today as the helicopters tried to spray water, but to no avail. our reporters are out in force on the story tonight. and we will go to japan in a moment. but first, let's head to martha raddatz who has been talking all day to the u.s. officials who are now helping the japanese. martha? >> reporter: diane, every day, the nuclear monster seems to get more frightening. but there is some hope tonight from that big u.s. push to send in water pumps. this coming after last ditch efforts by the japanese failed. one expert told us it's like using a squirt gun to put out a forest fire. japanese fire trucks using riot control water hoses to tackle red hot nuclear reactors. helicopters swooping overhead, dropping bucket af
and balanced. >> bret: a massive earthquake strikes japan. how is the u.s. responding? now there are concerns about nuclear power plants there. president obama says the noose is tightening around muammar gaddafi but events may suggest otherwise. saudi day of rage, did it materialize? live from the studio in washington. this is "special report." good evening. i'm bret baier. the u.s. and the rest of the world are mobilizing tonight to assist japan, following a massive earthquake and tsunami early this morning. the magnitude 8.9 offshore quake unleashed a 23-foot tsunami. hundreds are believed dead and that number could rise. japan says the power inside the nuclear plant is 1,000 times than the normal level. they lost control over pressure in reactors. waves hit hawaii and the u.s. west coast causing major damage to boats in one california harbor and one person is reported missing. japan's eastern coast saw massive devastation in an instant the office buildings became danger zones. >> i thought i was going to die. >> bret: the magnitude 8.9 offshore quake shook cities and villages up and down j
tomahawk cruise missiles fired from u.s. british ships and sur marines strapped to other defense facilities ashore. >> i tried to run up to the roof and then i saw the second explosion, i saw a huge fire coming up from that place. and there was a lot of noise kind hear some shooting. i can't determine whether it is an anti-craft shooting or gunfire shooting, it was very severe, very heavy. >>> i'm fredricka whitfield in atlanta. >> i'm michael holmes welcoming viewers to the special coverage in libya. >> anti-aircraft gunfire and explosions can be heard this hour in the libyan capital of tripoli. still unclear if that gunfire is in response to new air and missile strikes from coalition forces. cnn's nic robertson who is in tripoli, says smoke can be seen rising from the presidential compound. >> american, french and british military forces began these air strikes on saturday the mission is being dubbed operation odyssey dawn, a u.n.-approved operation, intended to stop the libyan leader, moammar gadhafi, from violating a cease-fire and i tacking his own people. >> multiple air and missile s
the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality. >> reporter: all of the uncertainty leading to more evacuation of locate from the immediate exclusion zone as well as from sendai the biggest city near the reactor complex. another evacuation center locals grumble over the perceived mishandling of t
the u.s. military is getting ready to take an extraordinary step evacuating troops from the island. >>> and i'm kiran chetry. no relief in sight for homeowners. new numbers showing how weak the housing market is. and even more troubling, analysts said we may not have hit bottom yet. "american morning" starts right now. >>> all right. it is tuesday, march 22nd. a lot of news this morning. again, it's been a wild couple of weeks. >> and it's well into the day in japan. already another two earthquakes today. we're well into the 600s in terms of aftershocks and tremors. more concerns there. >> we're going to bring everybody up to date on that. but first, we're going to start with libya. coalition forces hammering moammar gadhafi's forces and positions as the head of forces in libya said the coalition flew 80 missions yesterday more than half of them by countries other than the united states. also saying that the dictator's momentum has been stopped, at least for now. but in misrata, which is a key city two hours east of tripoli, people are saying that civilians are still being massacre
at the wreckage of a u.s. f-15 that crashed today in rebel-held eastern libya, for reasons the u.s. military says were mechanical, not hostile. i will say that again for you. the u.s. says the plane had equipment problems and was not shot down. the two-man crew jekted and the pilot was recovered quickly. the weapons officer was found by rebels and americans reached him. neither badly hurt. >>> back in tripoli, reporters saw the results of a missile landing on a port. >>> we also have remarkable pictures from misrata, a city down the coast that gadhafi forces have bombarded for days. this is amateur video uploaded to youtube yesterday. now, we can't confirm when or where it was shot, but we do know misrata's main hospital reports 77 deaths since sunday. the u.n.-approved campaign to protect libyan civilians began saturday and it's still not clear who will actually end up in charge. arab states don't want to work for nato and u.s. has other campaigns to worry about. nato says it will enforce a libyan arms embarge go the in meantime. let's bring in diana magnay, she's on the "uss keer sauj." nic rep
reactors in japan spooked investor confidence, and stock markets around the world sold off. here in the u.s., the panic- selling swept through wall street, but the major averages rebounded by the close of trading. the dow tumbled 137 points, reversing a loss of nearly 300 points earlier in the session. the nasdaq fell 33, and the s&p was down 15. so what happens now? erika miller reports. >> reporter: the moment the opening bell rang on wall street, fear gripped the stock market. trader art cashin says the disaster in japan prompted many investors to dump their holdings at any price. >> when you can't sell what you want to sell, you sell whatever you can-- sometimes, your grandmother's necklace. you don't like to sell that, but if that's the only thing that gets you money, you have to do that. >> reporter: the dow's decline was serious, but the drop was far worse in japan. the nikkei lost more than 10%. most european markets also fell. the question for investors is what to do now? is the stock market overreacting to the crisis in japan, or does it pose a major threat to global growth? marke
on the u.s. for more help. the non-stop battle. >>> japan's newest heroes, firefighters volunteering to fight the nuclear monster. >>> good morning. we begin with breaking news in the middle east. the u.s. and allies are preparing for a military strike against the government of moammar gadhafi. >> it comes after a vote from the u.n. security council to protect civilians at all costs. good morning, emily. >> reporter: good morning to you. for weeks now, the world condemned moammar gadhafi's people. now this puts force behind the words. four decades of moammar gadhafi's rule are challenged with a vote. >> translator: ten votes in favor. zero votes against. >> reporter: the u.n. security council voted a no-fly zone to protect rebels. >> this resolution demands an immediate cease-fire and an end to violence and attacks to civilians. >> reporter: this comes weeks after rebel resis tense. gadhafi said attacks are imminent. he said we are coming. we are looking for the traitors and should have no mercy or c e compassi compassion. gadhafi's son said his family is not afraid. >> what is your
. officials have been scrambling to avoid a meltdown ever since and are now asking the u.s. for help. >> in particular they have asked for additional types of equipment that will help provide water and other types of resources to ensure that the reactors continue to be cooled. >> reporter: fears of a full blown meltdown have spread all the way to tokyo located 150 miles from the plant. officials there have detected low levels of radiation and a shift in winds threatens to push it even further. even without a possible nuclear disaster, japan is facing its worst crisis since world war ii. death toll jumped to more than 2400 confirmed dead, but officials warn that number is likely to top 10,000. and now the country faces an economic crisis, as well. this morning japanese stocks plummeted more than 10%. as far as that radiation cloud, as i said, they have picked up low levels of radiation outside of tokyo, but there is another concern whether it intensifies and the wind shifts, it could head toward that area that was hardest hit by the earthquake and tsunami that followed. >> as we hear
earthquake will do to japan's fragile economy and the global markets. here in the u.s. despite the japan's stock index tumbled almost 180 points closing just minutes after the earthquake hit. >> tom: we spoke with our correspondent in tokyo. and began by asking lucy craft what's the initial assessment of damage to businesses and industry in japan. >> companies hit quite hard. sony, hond on, toyota, the major auto makers have a lot of factories up in northeastern japan. there's been a range of damage to these companies. so those factories will be kind of knocked out of operation for various amounts of time. fortunately, the northeastern area of japan is very sparsely populated. this is -- if you compare this to the kobe earthquake of 16 years ago, it accounts for a much smaller amount of gdp. >> reporter: what have you learned about the damage to the trainl systems and infrastructure? >> we haven't heard about the damage to the train system which is a major source of transportation here. when you talk about energy, though, it's a whole different ball of wax, and there's a lot of different
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